Category: Litigation Preparedness and Strategies

LOCATION CHANGE: Gibbons Fifth Annual E-Discovery Conference – November 3, 2011 0

LOCATION CHANGE: Gibbons Fifth Annual E-Discovery Conference – November 3, 2011

Due to the overwhelming popularity of our Fifth Annual E-Discovery Conference, we have changed the location of the event to the SHERATON MEADOWLANDS HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER, located at Two Meadowlands Plaza, East Rutherford, NJ. The Sheraton Meadowlands is only a few miles from downtown Newark, and is accessible via the New Jersey Turnpike, Garden State Parkway, and taxi service from the New Jersey Transit Secaucus train station (one stop from Newark or New York Penn Station).

Gearing Up for the Litigation Hold Panel Discussion at Gibbons Fifth Annual E-Discovery Conference 0

Gearing Up for the Litigation Hold Panel Discussion at Gibbons Fifth Annual E-Discovery Conference

Have you ever felt daunted by the prospect of issuing a litigation hold? If so, you are not alone — particularly in today’s dynamic legal environment, where even judges within the same judicial district disagree as to what is required to satisfy the duty to preserve evidence and avoid spoliation sanctions. Please join us at Gibbons Fifth Annual E-Discovery Conference, where we will deconstruct an effective litigation hold notice paragraph-by-paragraph, explaining why each element is included and how to tailor hold notices to any litigation. We will also explain recent developments in this area of the law, which you can draw on to position your company to effectively issue and administer litigation holds, avoid game-changing spoliation sanctions and return the focus to litigating matters on the merits.

E-Discovery Blog Post Written by Mark S. Sidoti Chosen as “Pick of the Week” by LitigationWorld 0

E-Discovery Blog Post Written by Mark S. Sidoti Chosen as “Pick of the Week” by LitigationWorld

In its October 3, 2011 issue, the editorial team of LitigationWorld chose Mark S. Sidoti’s September 28, 2011 blog post entitled New Jersey District Judge Grants Spoliation Sanctions Citing Negligent Litigation Hold Procedures as its Pick of the Week. LitigationWorld is a free weekly email newsletter that provides helpful tips regarding electronic discovery, litigation strategy, and litigation technology. Each week, the editorial team chooses the most noteworthy and insightful articles on the litigation web published during the previous week and, from those, selects one as their Pick of the Week.

New Jersey District Judge Grants Spoliation Sanctions Citing Negligent Litigation Hold Procedures 0

New Jersey District Judge Grants Spoliation Sanctions Citing Negligent Litigation Hold Procedures

Failure to properly preserve electronic evidence continues to provide at-risk litigants with the ability to steer the court from scrutiny of the merits, and drastically shift the balance of litigation leverage. The latest example of this is NVE, Inc. v. Palmeroni out of the District of New Jersey. This case involved NVE’s claims of breach of fiduciary duty against its former employee Palmeroni. At least on the specific Complaint allegations, NVE’s case against Palmeroni seems formidable — while working as a NVE salesman, the defendant allegedly entered into secret kickback arrangements with product purchasers, and formed a dummy entity with another NVE employee to divert sales of NVE’s products for their own benefit. Palmeroni was terminated in 2006 and later sued by NVE. Seems like a pretty good case, if the court and a jury could get to it.

So You Want to Be “Friends?”  Why Attorneys Should Think Twice About “Friending” Represented Parties or Witnesses on Facebook 0

So You Want to Be “Friends?” Why Attorneys Should Think Twice About “Friending” Represented Parties or Witnesses on Facebook

So you, as an attorney, want to be Facebook “friends” with an unrepresented party or witness? Well, what is your motivation? If you practice in California and want to use the private information in furtherance of your client’s case, think again because doing so may violate ethical rules and constitute engaging in “impermissible deception.”

Motion for Sanctions Denied Due to DuPont’s Reasonable, Professional Efforts to Implement and Update Litigation Hold Notices 0

Motion for Sanctions Denied Due to DuPont’s Reasonable, Professional Efforts to Implement and Update Litigation Hold Notices

On April 27, 2011, the Court denied Defendant Kolon Industries, Inc.’s (“Kolon”) motion for sanctions against E.I. du Pont De Nemours and Company (“DuPont”) for alleged spoliation of four employees’ e-mail accounts and documents in litigation regarding trade secret misappropriation, theft of confidential information and other related business torts. E.I. du Pont De Nemours and Co. v. Kolon Industries, Inc., Civil Action No. 3:09cv58, 2011 U.S. Dist. (E.D. Va. Apr. 27, 2011). In essence, the Court concluded there was no spoliation because DuPont’s efforts to implement and update litigation hold notices – as well as the company’s commitment to its electronic discovery obligations – were reasonable.

How Useful is Facebook’s “Download Your Information” Feature in E-Discovery? 0

How Useful is Facebook’s “Download Your Information” Feature in E-Discovery?

In October 2010, Facebook announced a new Download Your Information (“DYI”) feature, billed as “an easy way to quickly download to your computer everything you’ve ever posted on Facebook and all your correspondences with friends: your messages, wall posts, photos, status updates and profile information.” The Facebook announcement included a short video detailing how to use the feature. Cnet TV has a more in-depth video. Craig Ball also wrote an article about this feature in the February 23, 2011 issue of Law Technology News.

Courts Rely Upon Jury Instructions to Discourage Juror Use of Social Media and Electronic Devices 0

Courts Rely Upon Jury Instructions to Discourage Juror Use of Social Media and Electronic Devices

The explosion of social media and the universal availability of electronic devices have presented a host of courtroom issues the judicial system must address, ranging from substantive legal questions like the admissibility of Facebook accounts and Twitter postings, to more ministerial issues such as the extent to which electronic devices may be utilized by counsel in the courtroom. While different courts have reached varied conclusions on these questions, courts have uniformly rejected any attempt by jurors to use technology to research a case or to post information about a case to social media sites, and increasingly use pre-trial and post-closing jury instructions.

Show Me The Evidence – Use of Social Media Information at Trial 0

Show Me The Evidence – Use of Social Media Information at Trial

A defendant in an employment action discovers through Facebook that a plaintiff has lied about her discrimination claim. The information essentially undermines plaintiff’s entire claim. However, such information does not make it to a factfinder at trial unless the evidentiary foundations can be established — proof of authorship and timeliness. These evidentiary foundations are not easy to establish in the ever-changing medium of social media. The anonymity offered by some social networking sites may be what makes them attractive to users, but it also makes establishing authorship of content difficult. Similarly, social media sites are constantly changing, as users can add, remove or edit content at any time. As a result, recreating a post or a profile from a particular moment in time can be difficult, if not impossible, depending on how a partciluar site functions.